Camas Restoration and Traditional Pit Roast, October 21st

Click to read more about camassia quamash.The camas plant is ecologically important to western Washington prairies. It is also important to the cultural history of the Pacific Northwest. “Camas,” according to Native American Netroots, “is very high in protein: 5.4 ounces of protein per pound of roots. In comparison, steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) has 3.4 ounces of protein per pound.” Generations of local people have gathered and consumed camas. Early white explorers, too, learned how to find and prepare camas. “Some American explorers report eating camas that had been prepared 36 years earlier.”

Click image for a larger version.

The camas plant is an important part of South South prairies and we recently published an article regarding efforts to restore a piece of the prairie many of us pass through, every day.

You are invited to join the Squaxin Tribe and Thurston Conservation District to celebrate prairies, community, and camas.

Community for Camas
Saturday, October 21
11 AM to 2 PM
6710 Sexton Dr. NW, Olympia
Parking will be on the street with overflow parking at Griffin School.

This project brings together the tribe and community members to restore a small prairie in the Steamboat Island/Highway 101 interchange by planting camas and removing invasive species. Through restoration and partnerships, this parcel of land can be used as a teaching space for students of all ages!

Highlights include:

  • Learn about the cultural and ecological importance of camas from Squaxin tribal members
  • Plant camas bulbs on the site
  • Share food prepared in a traditional pit roast
  • Meet neighbors in your community!

If you have questions, contact Stephanie Bishop, of the Thurston County Conservation District, at sbishop@thurstoncd.com or 360-754-3588, ext. 108.

Many thanks to the event sponsors: Squaxin Island Tribe, Thurston Conservation District, Washington Native Plant Society, Washington State Department of Transportation, Steamboat Conservation Partnership, and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Let Us Not Pollute

When I was a teenager and young adult, I cared about the environmental pollution. I would SCUBA in Puget Sound and the San Juan Islands. I was acutely aware that the salt water I got in my mouth, eyes, and my ears needed to be somewhat pure or I would get sick.

My peers dumped oil and fuel as they felt it necessary. There was really, nowhere, to dump small amounts of petroleum products safely. Even the most environmentally sensitive of my peers would dump a quart of old gasoline on a gravel road with the hope that it would evaporate instead of run down stream or get into the water table.

I did everything in my power to use up the gasoline which I used in outboard motors and lawn mowers. Yet from time to time I had leftover fuel. I would try to evaporate it on hot days in the summer in a pie tin. It was a slow and dangerous process and obviously contributed to air pollution.

Over the recent decades, I refused to dump or try to evaporate fuel. Every few years some agency would be accepting fuel or oil and I would save it until I could dispose of it properly.

Over the past five years, I saved eight gallons of fuel and oil. In desperation I loaded up the car and went over to the Thurston County Dump. At the dump is a place called "hazo-house."

Instead of me begging for information about where to properly get rid of the hazardous materials; they opened up my car and took it away while I was talking to somebody. I asked how much it would cost. It was free!

So get rid of your lawn mower and outboard motor fuel, when it spoils, at the dump. Don’t pollute!

JamesNugent

James Nugent is a local author who now has 104 e-books, 95 paperbacks, and 53 audio books available at Amazon.com

In his book, An Alternative Boating Guide to Southern Puget Sound, Mr. Nugent "will examine five of the Southern Puget Sound Inlets from a recreational and a personally reflective point of view. Perhaps this unique perspective of not rushing from one place to another; a connoisseur’s perspective, will inspire you to go and be there. As I describe what I did in each inlet at one time or another; you are invited to add your expertise and seamanship, and create your own plans for adventure and leisure."

Lions Club Invites You to Help Make a World of Difference, Here in the Griffin Area

You may know them as the people who recycle your eyeglasses. That is part of activities begun by the Lions after, in 1925, Helen Keller “challenged Lions to become ‘knights of the blind in the crusade against darkness.'” There has been a Lions Club in the Olympia area since 1935. Now there is a Lions Club being formed right here on the Steamboat Peninsula. You are invited to come this Monday and learn more about this organization of “1.4 million men and women who believe that kindness matters.”

Olympia Steamboat Peninsula Lions Club
Monday, August 28
6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Griffin Fire Station 2, 8113 Steamboat Island Rd NW, Olympia, WA

Please take note: The meeting is not at the fire department headquarters. The meeting is being held at Station 2, more than halfway up the peninsula.

Local resident and Lions Club member Karen Sell and others have come together to form the newest branch of the Olympia Lions Club. According to an event notification on Nextdoor, “We have selected officers and project leads and invite anyone interested to join us as we develop more ways to enhance our community here on the Steamboat Peninsula. Projects we are already planning are local apple sales, vision and hearing screenings for our area school children, and the distribution of dictionaries to local third grade students.”

For many of us, the Lions Club is a name with which we are familiar. But what and who are the Lions? Lions Clubs International traces its roots back to 1917, in Chicago. Their mission is “To empower volunteers to serve their communities, meet humanitarian needs, encourage peace and promote international understanding through Lions clubs” and “To be the global leader in community and humanitarian service.” In the Olympia area, you may have seen Lions working to support organizations such as the the Little Red Schoolhouse ProjectHomeless Backpacks, Senior Services for South Sound, and the Thurston County Food Bank.

Now there is a branch of the Lions Club forming to identify projects of interest here in the Griffin area.

“If you are excited about improving the sense of community here on the peninsula – and getting involved in some local service projects – this could be for you,” wrote Karen Sell, on Nextdoor. “Come to a meeting to learn more.”

The Lions Club Annual Fuji Apples Sale Has Begun

The new Olympia Steamboat Peninsula Lions Club branch is now taking orders for 40 pound boxes of Fuji apples – fresh from the orchard in Wenatchee – for just $30. Proceeds benefit Camp Leo summer camp for children with diabetes and Lions vision screening/eyeglasses for children.

“October is just around the corner, just think of the pies and other great treats you can make as the temps start down,” wrote local member Mike Reavis. Orders must be in by September 25 – Apples will be delivered to you in October. If you would like to order or have questions, email Mike at TechL0rd1992@Gmail.com with your phone number for a call back or your email address.

Update:

Congratulations to Elaine Moore of Steamboat Island Road, who has won the free 40 pound box of Fuji apples given away by the Olympia Host Lions to advertise their apple sale and the formation of a new Steamboat Island peninsula Lions branch.

And if you did not win the free apples from the Lions, you still have a chance to get a 40 pound box of those luscious Fuji apples at the ridiculously low price of just $30 – that is just about 75 cents a pound.

The Steamboat Lions will induct 10 new members into their branch September 10. If you would like to be a part of the new Lions club working on projects for the Steamboat Peninsula, contact Karen Sell at karenlsell@gmail.com and she will reply with all the details.

39th Blueberry Bash is Sunday, August 20

This Sunday, August 20th, is the 39th Blueberry Bash at St. Christopher’s Community Church!

The Oly Mountain Boys

This year’s Bash will benefit the Thurston County Food Bank. Bring a canned food donation and buy a pie to support the Food Bank.

Sunday, August 20
12 noon to 4 PM
St. Christopher’s Community Church
7902 Steamboat Island Rd. NW

Free, live entertainment by the Oly Mountain Boys, from 12 noon to 3:30 PM.

  • Silent Auction
  • Bingo Garden
  • Great Prizes

Summertime Family Fun!

  • Activities for the young at heart, from 12 noon to 4 PM
  • Bounce House
  • Giant Bubble Station
  • Face Painting
  • Many more kids activities

Information Booths

  • Thurston County Food Bank – St. Christopher’s Church is an official food bank satellite location
  • Open Hands Garden – Growing food and collecting donations from gardens in the Steamboat Island peninsula community
  • Griffin Fire Department – Blood pressure tests and CPR demonstrations

Many thanks to this year’s sponsors of the Blueberry Bash

Awesome Local Food

  • Famous homemade blueberry pies – plus other fruit fillings supplied by Spooner Berry Farms
  • Brats and 100% beef Polish sausages
  • Ice cream milkshakes – thanks to a generous donation by Olympic Mountain Ice Cream
  • Xinh’s eggrolls and geoduck chowder – courtesy of Taylor Shellfish Farms
  • Buy a homemade pie and support the Thurston County Food Bank

Click for a larger image

You won’t want to miss this annual summertime event, celebrating its 39 years here on the Steamboat Peninsula!

Steamboat Neighbors Pull for Prairies

Camas blooming on the prairie (photo: Stephanie Bishop)

Camas blooming on the prairie
(photo credit: Stephanie Bishop)
Click for a larger image

There are two magnificent oak trees on the corner of Steamboat Island Road and Sexton Drive. As a Griffin parent, I have driven by those oaks hundreds of times on the way to school, marveling at the dense mats of moss and ferns growing on strong limbs and the remnant prairie plants growing beneath. Late last winter, I stopped. I walked under the oaks and imagined how this native prairie habitat would look with rivers of camas running through it like long ago. The picture of a restored prairie in our backyard was too pretty to let go of, and is what prompted me to start doing some digging.

It turns out this small parcel is a part of Schneider’s Prairie and owned by the Washington Department of Transportation (WSDOT). WSDOT also happens to be very supportive of protecting the oaks and restoring the prairie. Native prairies like this used to cover large sections of Thurston County, though mostly down south near the Glacial Heritage Preserve and Mima Mounds where some are still present. Today only about 3% of this habitat still exists. Scotch broom and sun-loving Douglas fir thrive in these open areas and conversion to forest can happen quickly without the traditional land management practice of controlled burns. Camas, that beautiful blue flower growing in pockets around the Steamboat/101 interchange, is a culturally important “First Food” cultivated by indigenous people of the area. Burning prairies not only increases this food source, it improves soil conditions to support myriad pollinators and endemic species. According to local historian Steve Lundin, Schneider’s Prairie was probably last burned more than 200 years ago.

Volunteers remove invasive species (photo credit: Joanne Schuett-Hames)

Volunteers remove invasive species
(photo credit: Joanne Schuett-Hames)

Presenting the idea of prairie restoration to the Steamboat community was like setting a spark in a dry field.  A single email to members of the Steamboat Conservation Partnership (SCP) this spring resulted in an immediate site visit and two work parties. Outfitted with gloves, chain saws, weed wrenches and clippers, SCP volunteers and other friends and neighbors removed the encroaching Douglas fir seedlings, cut down non-native black locust trees, pulled scotch broom and whacked back 10’ high Himalayan blackberry! After reaching out to Griffin School, seventy-five 4th graders helped out this May by removing brush from the prairie.  They also learned about traditional camas harvest from Shawna Zierdt (Griffin parent, Native Plant Specialist and member of the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians) who demonstrated digging techniques and showed students how the relationship between Native people and the prairies is deep and present.

Griffin students visit the prairie (photo credit: Shawna Zierdt)

Griffin students visit the prairie
(photo credit: Shawna Zierdt)

This project has had a tremendous jump start, thanks to the outpouring of interest and support from the Steamboat community. I wish I could say that the prairie has been fully restored, but there is still work to be done. Invasive plants will continue to move in and will need to be removed manually unless the property is burned, which is an idea for the future. In the meantime, 1,000 camas bulbs are on order and will be planted this fall, most of which are expected to bloom the following spring. Some of the invasive plants will be covered with black geotextile material to kill the plants and roots, while others will be hand cut and pulled to keep them under control.

The progress that has been made at this site in just a few short months is impressive. Special thanks goes out to SCP members and volunteers Jack Sisco, Paul Meury, Bonnie Blessing-Earle, Mark Fischer, Jim Leonard, Steve Lundin, Skip McGinty, Peter Reid, Elizabeth Roderick, and Joanne and Dave Schuett-Hames for sharing knowledge of this site, offering suggestions on how to proceed, and most of all showing up at work parties ready to work! We are also grateful to AmeriCorps member Hanna Jones, the US Fish and Wildlife’s Connecting People with Nature program, WSDOT, Griffin School, and the Washington Native Plant Society for their support and interest in this project. We welcome new ideas and volunteers to this project.  Feel free to contact Thurston Conservation District staff member Stephanie Bishop at sbishop@thurstoncd.com to learn more about the project and/or how you can get involved.

By Stephanie Bishop, Thurston Conservation District

Join Us for a Community Picnic, Sunday, July 30

You are invited to join us this Sunday, July 30, for a community picnic at the Prosperity Grange and Tin Cup Golf Range!

There will be plenty of complimentary food, a showcase of local organizations and businesses, animals and activities for families, and a special musical guest.

Austin RadioSunday, July 30
12 noon to 4 PM
Prosperity Grange and Tin Cup Golf Range

An illness prevents the Olympia duo, “Austin Radio“, from appearing at this year’s picnic. Instead, musicians Roger & Deb Hamilton will perform. Roger Hamilton crafts fine, handmade guitars at Hamilton Guitars in Rochester. Contact Roger at (253) 722-3442 or rahguitars@gmail.com for more information.

You won’t want to miss the delicious seafood dishes served by Xinh Dwelley, proprietor of the fabled Xinh’s Crab & Oyster House.

Griffin Fire Department

The Griffin Fire Department will hold a benefit car wash, this same day. Please come on by and get your car or truck washed, for a good cause.

Here’s a sample of some of the organizations and local businesses who will be attending:

And many more!

If you are a new member who joins the Griffin Neighborhood Association, at the picnic, your name will be entered into a drawing to win a $25 gift certificate donated by Character’s Corner.

The Olympia Host Lions Club are raffling off a 40-pound box of fresh fuji apples, to be delivered in October. Make sure you stop by their table to get entered into the raffle.

Special thanks to our event sponsors:

Character’s Corner

Island Johnny

Jay’s Farm Stand

Steamboat Trading Post

Taylor Shellfish Farms

Thurston County Explorer Search and Rescue

Tin Cup Driving Range

Xinh Dwelley

Lots of opportunities still exist, if you are able to volunteer to help with this event. There are tasks that take little time and people are needed to work for as little as an hour or so, the actual day of the picnic. For information about how you can help, please contact Becky at FurAcres@gmail.com

Bring your family and visit with your neighbors, enjoy a delicious meal, and listen to the sounds of Austin Radio at this free community event.

 

Annual Report of the Steamboat Conservation Partnership

The Steamboat Conservation Partnership recently released its latest annual report. As many of you know, the SCP’s fiscal year begins July 1st of each year. Among the highlights are an eighth successful year of operation, continued planning, and collaboration with the Capitol Land Trust to identify important parcels in our area, for preservation. Here are excerpts from the CLT’s annual report:

Donations: During our 2016 – 2017 fiscal year (July 1, 2016 through June 30, 2017), we raised $20,727 for Capitol Land Trust, earmarked to finance part of their activities within the Steamboat Peninsula Region where most of us live and/or own property. Donations during the month of June were enhanced by three of our donors matching, dollar for dollar, any donations not exceeding a combined total of $1,500. This allowed us to exceed our annual goal of $15,000 in collections by more than 33.3%. This matching program was a first for the Steamboat Conservation Partnership.

Over the eight years of our existence, we have raised $134,129 for Capitol Land Trust, which is $14,129 above our goal of $120,000 for that eight-year period. We should all be very proud of generating these funds to ensure that many of our natural areas will be available to our children, grandchildren, and beyond.

Activities: This spring many of us in the Steamboat Conservation Partnership, along with friends and neighbors, began restoring a remnant portion of Schneider Prairie. The remnant is located on the north side of the Highway 101 overpass, where the majestic oak tree stands on the SW corner of Steamboat Island Road and Sexton Road. Many of us pass this site on our daily commutes.

We removed blackberries, scotch broom, and invasive non-native trees. Later, 4th Grade classes from the Griffin School worked the site to prepare for fall plantings of native prairie wildflowers and grasses. The project is led by Stephanie Bishop, a parent of Griffin School kids who works for the Thurston Conservation District. Long-time Steamboat Conservation Partnership participants Jack Sisco and Joanne Schuett-Hames helped organize the efforts.

This special project builds on past efforts of the Griffin Neighborhood Association. Years ago, members of the Griffin Neighborhood Association planted Gerry oak trees and other native vegetation in this and other areas after the freeway overpass was built on Steamboat Island Road. At that time Griffin School teachers initiated a long-term monitoring project on the nearby Schneider Creek. This newly restored area will be will now be used as a second outdoor educational site where students learn about our local prairie, and the traditional uses of prairie plants by Native Americans.

Read More

Sovereign Cellars’ Spring Release Wine Tasting Event, June 24 and 25

Click the image for a larger view.

Dennis Gross, winemaker for Sovereign Cellars, invites local residents to the Sovereign Cellars’ Spring Release Wine Tasting Event. “Our vintage wines have turned out exceptional. Please come enjoy friends, hors d’oeurves and our four great Sovereign Cellars red wines.”

Saturday, June 24th and Sunday, June 25th
1 pm to 5 pm
7408 Manzanita Dr. NW, Olympia, WA 98502
Take Steamboat Rd to 79th turn right and follow the signs.

For more information about Sovereign Cellars and their award winning reds, click here to visit their web site.

 

Feline Friends Kick Off Series of Plant Sales Beginning May 6th

The weekend of May 6 marks the first of a series of four area plant sales with proceeds dedicated to local organizations that spay and neuter pets and provide adoption services for pets. This is a terrific opportunity to acquire perennials, beautiful dahlias, herbs, some vegetables, or to choose from a large variety of unusual plants at great prices. And, that fourth sale is both a plant sale and a garage sale, where you are invited to donate gently-used, saleable items, to benefit Feline Friends.

All these sales will happen, rain or shine!  And 100% of proceeds benefit homeless pets.

Many thanks to Diane Jacob, at Cameron Gardens, and other local gardeners, for providing the plants and staffing these four sales.

Feline Friends Plant Sale
Saturday, May 6th
9 AM to 2 PM
Griffin School6530 33rd Ave, Olympia just off Hwy 101 at Steamboat Island Rd Exit
There will be an outstanding variety of flowering perennials and some annuals as well as some dahlia tubers.
Call (360) 866-1909 for more information.


Adopt-A-Pet Plant Sale
Saturday, May 13th
9:30 AM to 3 PM
Our Community Credit Union parking lot, 2948 Olympic Hwy N, Shelton
Just in time for Mother’s Day. There will be large hanging fuchsia baskets as well as many green house raised annuals.
Call (360) 432-3091 for more information.


S.N.A.P. (Spay & Neuter All Pets) Plant Sale
Saturday, May 27th
9 AM to 3 PM
Thurston County Animal Services, 3120 Martin Way, Olympia
There will be many plant choices to check out here including wonderful donations from Briggs Nursery as well as different local gardeners.
Call (360) 352-2510 for more information.


Close Out Plant & Garage Sale to Benefit Feline Friends
Saturday, June 3rd
9 AM to 2 PM
Griffin School6530 33rd Ave, Olympia just off Hwy 101 at Steamboat Island Rd Exit
Do you have saleable items to contribute? Please bring them to Griffin between 6pm-8pm Friday, June 3rd or call (360) 866-1909.

Your support will be helping dedicated organizations in Thurston and Mason Counties in the never-ending quest to spay and neuter all pets to save hundreds of lives every year.

 

Building Earth Farm Announces Summer CSA, Fruit Subscription

The folks at Building Earth Farm wish you all, “Happy Spring, local food-lovers!”

“We are already planting seeds for this year’s garden, the initial tilling has been wrought, the weed whacker had it’s first outing today, and the promise of summer’s sweetness is just beginning to swell. We need to know ASAP if you plan to join us for our 2017 summer/autumn food adventure.”

The quick details are:

2017 CSA price is $575/full Share and $290/half Share

The schedule for the CSA is:

June 17, 24
July 1, 8, 15, 22, 29
Aug 5, 12, 19, 26
Sept 2, 9, 16, 23, 30

Fruit Only Shares – $330 for 8 Weeks, provided every 2 weeks.

They will finalize the start date for Fruit Only once they’re sure how the season is moving but the tentative schedule for the fruit subscription is:

June 17
July 1, 15, 29
Aug 12, 26
Sept 19, 23

Signups are now open and are required by May 5th. Deposits for CSA and summer fruit share are due by May 15. First come, first served.

For those of you not sure what a CSA entails, or want more information about The Building Earth Farm’s CSA and Fruit Subscription, read on!Read More